Vintage ARRL Video – “Enjoy The Flicker”

Vintage ARRL ham radio movie. Converted from 16mm film to video tape many years ago, and now from that ancient VHS to digital. Enjoy the flickering screen, and especially the funky organ music backgrounds! heavy focus on Morse code, which of course is no longer a requirement.

From the desk of Russ, KH6JRM:

Many thanks to KF5OEF for finding this little gem. This vintage film takes me back to the days of my old HW-101, the D-104 mike, and the trusty 40 meter dipole strung between two pine trees near the old sugar plantation in Honokaa (along the Hamakua Coast of Hawaii Island). When I worked cw (which was most of the time), I used an old J-38 key (which I still have). Things seemed simplier and more civil in those days 36 years ago. How time flies. Amateur Radio is still fun, despite the few obnoxious operators I run into on 75 and 20 meters. Thanks for the memories! Aloha de Russ, KH6JRM.

Things To Know Before Getting Your First Two Way Radio

 

BAOFENG UV-B5

A two way radio differs from a broadcast radio in the sense that it can receive as well as send messages and it can be used for communication between two people. Two way radios are available in several different configurations. Configurations include hand held radios, mobile radios and stationary base radios.

Radios can either operate in a full duplex mode or a half duplex mode. In full duplex, two way radios can be used to both send and receive voice or data at the same time over different channels or frequencies. In half duplex, two way radios can be used for either sending or receiving voice or data over a single channel.

There are various things that you should  take into account with two way radios prior to making a purchase. Generally handheld or HT two way radios are very compact, are light weight and are very affordable. Two way radios are available in different styles and are used for a large number of applications. Two way handheld radios have a push to talk button which makes it very convenient to use. Two way handheld radios are available with either rechargeable batteries or replaceable batteries. Handheld batteries are usually made of nickel and cadmium or lithium ion.

Two way radios operate in different ranges. The range specifies the distance that can be used in a two way communication. Two way radios can operate over short ranges or longer ranges depending on various factors like the frequency, terrain, output power, etc. Most two way radios operate in a “line of sight” manner. That is the antennas of two way radios must “see” each other. This just means that they cannot work well in hilly areas and in places where there are large obstructions such as city buildings.

Two way radios today come with a large number of features. Two way radios can use repeaters to help with communicating over longer distances and in areas where line of sight communication is not possible. Some two way radios also provide an option to use the computer in conjunction with a terminal node controller or TNC. The TNC converts the digital data from the computer to analog data which is then transmitted / received by two way radios. Packet radio networks have been around since the 1980′s and are used to communicate with Amateur Radio stations locally and worldwide.

Another thing new users must know about two way radios is that they may or may not require licenses to operate. When toy like two way radios are used as a personal radio within the home for example, there is no need to apply for a license. In addition, radio controlled toys do not require a license.

However, most two way radios do require some form of a license. Operating  Amateur Radio equipment does require a license from the country you live in. In the U.S. the FCC controls all Amateur Radio licenses. All business or commercial radios in the U.S require licenses issued by the FCC.

Two way radios operate on different “channels” or frequencies. Since these “channels” are open anyone can listen to the communication or intercept the messages being sent. To prevent this to some degree, radios come with privacy codes of sorts. Most two way radios and police scanners include the ability to scan the channels and automatically detect these so called privacy codes. Therefore there is no such thing as a truly “private” channel.

Today, entry level Amateur Radio equipment can be purchased for as little as $50 to $75. One of the most popular introductory two way radios is the BAOFENG two way radio because of its included options and its very low cost.

Shopping online offers you the advantage of performing price comparisons, reading customer reviews and selecting the best deal before you make your purchase. When purchasing through eBay, as opposed to most other online stores, you are offered buyer protection. And if you should make your purchase with PayPal, your purchase is usually doubly protected.

So stop by and visit The eHamStore For All Of Your TWO WAY RADIO needs. There are no hidden fees and no sign ups are required.

LIMARC Hamfest

Getting back into blogging after a long layoff is starting to be fun again. Remembering how to spell and finding all the keys is another story. As you can see above I finally updated the Special Events and Hamfest Pages. Whoopee!

In addition, here’s a quickie about a local (to me) Hamfest  to get your 2013 Ham Radio Juice flowing. 

hamfest

LIMARC is having its Next (2013) Hamfest on March 3rd. The Hamfest is located at the Levittown Hall in Hicksville, NY.

For detailed information click here.

Hope to see you there!

First Half of 2010 Sees Upswing in New Amateur Radio Licenses

Ham Radio License

Get Your Ham Radio License

With more than 18,000 new Amateur Radio licenses issued in the first half of this year — 18, 270 to be exact — 2010 is shaping up to be a banner year for Amateur Radio. So far, the number of new licenses issued by the FCC in 2010 is outpacing the January-June 2009 totals by almost 8.5 percent; at this time last year, the FCC had issued 16,844 new licenses.

See full Article here:

http://www.arrl.org/news/first-half-of-2010-sees-upswing-in-new-amateur-radio-licenses

Ham Radio. A Dying Hobby? Guess Again…

ST. LOUIS (ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO)

- Only a few years ago, blogs listed ham radio alongside 35mm film and VHS tape as technologies slated to disappear.

They were wrong.

Nearly 700,000 Americans have ham radio licenses up 60 percent from 1981, a generation ago. And the number is growing.

Ham radio will never have the sex appeal of the iPhone, but it does have a certain nerd appeal, says Allen Weiner, an analyst at the technology research firm Gartner.

“If it creates its own experience, that’s really what’s key here,” he says. “If it just emulates an experience that you can get online, it’s not going to grow.”

Read the full article here over at St Louis Public Radio

A Communications Class Email

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 1:25 PM,

Hi!

My name is Kristi Nichols, I am a communications teacher, I am working on finding links about amateur Radio to post on our class site.  While looking for pages on hams I found your page (http://ehamstore.com/ham_radio_sites) which was very helpful. Thanks so much :)

I noticed you missed a great page on ham radios: http://www.answerconnect.com/articles/the-ham-radio-resource-guide . It looks like a very nice overview on hams, it provides a nice overview, along with providing links to very resourceful pages including technical specs, call signs, terminology, licensing, and equipment.   I plan on using this page in my list of resources.

Have a wonderful day :)

Kristi

Now we need more communication teachers like Kristi. I hope she gets some more hits from my readers. There are  good resources to reference on the class site. Take a minute and spin your browser over there!

Hooked on DIY?

Story:
HAMMING IT UP: Amateur radio operators find themselves hooked on do-it-yourself technology

On Jan. 6, 1838, the message, “A patient waiter is no loser,” went out across a telegraph line set up in Morristown, N.J. It was the first successful attempt to send a telegram, and it traveled an unheard of distance — two miles.

Six years later, another telegram was sent, this time from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, setting in motion an industry that has been the precursor of cell phones and the Internet.

For more of this story, click on or type the URL below:

http://www.timesanddemocrat.com/articles/2010/02/21/features/14317828.txt

2009 Reveals Surge In Ham Radio Licenses

According to the ARRL VEC  more than 30,000 new licenses were issued in 2009.

Apparently, the restructuring of the licensing process by the FCC in 2007 has elevated the demand for exam sessions and this past year was a banner year for new Amateur Radio licensees.

Ham Radio License

Get Your Ham Radio License

ARRL VEC Manager Maria Somma, AB1FM  said. “This high level of exam session activity has produced an elevated influx of new applications,  far outpacing recent years.”

30,144  licenses were granted in 2009 which is an increase of about 7.5 percent over 2008.  16,368 licenses were issued in 2005 showing that the restructuring has caused an impressive 84 percent gain over 2005.

Other than the standard books which are always available, there are other ways to study for your license.

If the idea of downloading and learning from an audio source appeals to you try visiting http://fccexam.com/

More news about the Licensing Increase can be found at
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2010/01/06/11278/?nc=1

Visit the AH0A for detailed licensing statistics
http://www.ah0a.org/